landscape painting

Desert Channels, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Desert Channels. The Impulse to Conserve launched

There were 17 contributors to "Desert Channels. The Impulse to Conserve" at the very successful launch at the Hugh Sawrey gallery, Stockmans Hall of Fame in Longreach, swelling the large crowd to 95-100 people. We sold 30 or so books on the night and did quite a few media releases for radio and newspaper. http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2010/09/27/3023188.htm

http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2010/09/27/3023188.htm?site=westqld

and links from ABC Western Qld http://www.abc.net.au/westqld and http://www.abc.net.au/northwest

Tropical storms are still rolling around the Desert Channels and Simon and Christine Campbell were cut off by the raging Barcoo River! Nella and Mark Lithgow did make it through from Cravens Peak Reserve, as fortunately did Bruce and Maureen Scott from Windorah and Angus and Karen Emmott from Stonehenge, everyone's vehicles were well plastered with mud though! 10 of us went on and stayed at Noonbah, near Stonehenge with Karen and Angus Emmott on Saturday, to watch the grandfinal of course with pies and beer provided by Faye Alexander. Due to the road being closed, we changed plans and didn't stay with Simon and Christine at Blackall so 8 of us then descended on Maureen and Bruce Scott for the night at Moothadella, Windorah and were able to celebrate with Bob Morrish who joined us for the night also.

Dave Thompson's welcome to country at the SHOF was excellent and people thought the powerpoint he presented, including early, hauntingly damning Hansard records of politicians views of Aboriginal people and counter-visual evidence of long occupation of Country,  was powerfully informative. Bruce Scott's opening speech was moving and very much to the point revealing his great love of the Channel Country. He bestowed great honour on the contributors by comparing our quest to write about and make images of the Channel Country with the aims of the celebrated writings of Alice Duncan Kemp. I hope to send you all his text in due course. It was great to see the intercanges in the crowd during the night and a good mob of about 35 went onto dinner after. where the discussions continued.

The launch at the Rain on the Rangelands conference in Bourke on Monday night was also a big event, 230 participants were seated  right on the banks of the old wharf on Bourke and we were given a 20 minute time slot for our launch which put is in full spot light. Geoff Wise was enthusiastic and generous in his speech, I was able to introduce Chris Dickman as the NSW Scientist of the year and once Chris and I had recovered from the shock of talking to such a big crowd, were kept busy signing books for some time after the speeches and when I saw Melinda Chandler from CSIRO last,the following day, shortly after Guy Fitzhardinge's challenging keynote address, she was still selling. Half of the print run has been sold already, it seems, so don't delay your contributor discounted purchases too long into the future!

I'm sorry you couldn't all be there to celebrate this significant achievement but we hope to catch up with more of you at "The Big Wet" National Museum Forum on 22 October 12-2 pm, which will launch the book in another context.

Desert Channels, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Desert Channels. The Impulse to Conserve. Book launch and Exhibition

You are invited to experience an exhibition of new art and writing about and by the people of the Desert Channels Country.Please join some of the 46 contributors at the launch by

Bruce Scott, Mayor of the Barcoo Shire.

Hugh Sawrey Gallery, Australian Stockman’s Hall of Fame, Longreach, Queensland 6.00– 8.00 pm 24 September 2010 Event Free Please RSVP September 17 aldr.martin@bigpond.com

WEBSITE: http://environmentalhistory-au-nz.org/desert-channels/ To order: http://www.publish.csiro.au/nid/21/pid/6406.htm

Kimberley Artists, Mangkaja Arts, Painting Country, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Mangkaja Residency 2010 Part 1

Mandy Martin, Mangkaja Residency, June 2010  

This is fourth year I have painted Gooniyandi Country with artists from Muludja and particularly the Cherel family. Everyone seemed to want to come, we had 13 people painting in all, excluding Henry Surprise who took photos for me, and I arrived early after the short drive over the Fitzroy River from Fossil Downs to pick people up. June Davis and Mervyn Street brought their own 4WD, with Travis Leonard driving and Rohnanna Cherel, Jai Cherel, Henry Surprise, Fabian Davis, Tessie Cherabun, Bronwyn Malo and Jane and Ann Halloway all climbing in as well. I took Isaac, Edna and Katrina Cherel along with me for the 2 ½ hour drive out to Painted Rocks on Fossil Downs. We met up with the group of visitors who had been at Fossil Downs Station owner, John Henwood’s 70th birthday in Broome, for smoko and demolished a few slabs of John’s birthday cake made in the shape of a grader and with thick yellow and black icing. The reunion was emotional, Merrilee MacDonald, Fossil Downs descendent, is a fluent Gooniyandi/ Giya speaker. Henry Surprise and Mervyn Street were also pleased to see their old Fossil Downs stockman friends, Bill O’ Dougherty and Peter Gray.

Some of the younger people hadn’t visited Painted Rocks or as Gooniyandi Cherel, named them, Imanara, and spent a long time exploring the site.

The men were very excited to point out the holes where in the old days, they stored their bush tucker to keep it cool and away from predators.

The rock art is ancient and most significant and it was moving to hear a group of people at the site all talking in their own tongue with great respect and excitement.

After exploring the rock paintings and rock markings, we moved back a kilometre or so to a site Mervyn had chosen as we had approached earlier in the morning, everyone set up and painted for some hours except Henry Surprise who took photos for us.

At the end of the afternoon we all went fishing at a nearby spring and the women pulled in perch and bream with out effort it seemed, then cooked them immediately.

The dying hours of the day were spent trying to change a flat tyre, a long and difficult job requiring some real bush skills, we all got home a few hours later than planned. Issac Cherel was just able to show us the red sand, the only for many kilometres around, where the Rainbow Serpent had gone into the ground, before darkness fell.

Kimberley Artists, Mangkaja Arts, Painting Country, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Mangkaja Residency 2010 Part 1

Mandy Martin, Mangkaja Residency, June 2010  

This is fourth year I have painted Gooniyandi Country with artists from Muludja and particularly the Cherel family. Everyone seemed to want to come, we had 13 people painting in all, excluding Henry Surprise who took photos for me, and I arrived early after the short drive over the Fitzroy River from Fossil Downs to pick people up. June Davis and Mervyn Street brought their own 4WD, with Travis Leonard driving and Rohnanna Cherel, Jai Cherel, Henry Surprise, Fabian Davis, Tessie Cherabun, Bronwyn Malo and Jane and Ann Halloway all climbing in as well. I took Isaac, Edna and Katrina Cherel along with me for the 2 ½ hour drive out to Painted Rocks on Fossil Downs. We met up with the group of visitors who had been at Fossil Downs Station owner, John Henwood’s 70th birthday in Broome, for smoko and demolished a few slabs of John’s birthday cake made in the shape of a grader and with thick yellow and black icing. The reunion was emotional, Merrilee MacDonald, Fossil Downs descendent, is a fluent Gooniyandi/ Giya speaker. Henry Surprise and Mervyn Street were also pleased to see their old Fossil Downs stockman friends, Bill O’ Dougherty and Peter Gray.

Some of the younger people hadn’t visited Painted Rocks or as Gooniyandi Cherel, named them, Imanara, and spent a long time exploring the site.

The men were very excited to point out the holes where in the old days, they stored their bush tucker to keep it cool and away from predators.

The rock art is ancient and most significant and it was moving to hear a group of people at the site all talking in their own tongue with great respect and excitement.

After exploring the rock paintings and rock markings, we moved back a kilometre or so to a site Mervyn had chosen as we had approached earlier in the morning, everyone set up and painted for some hours except Henry Surprise who took photos for us.

At the end of the afternoon we all went fishing at a nearby spring and the women pulled in perch and bream with out effort it seemed, then cooked them immediately.

The dying hours of the day were spent trying to change a flat tyre, a long and difficult job requiring some real bush skills, we all got home a few hours later than planned. Issac Cherel was just able to show us the red sand, the only for many kilometres around, where the Rainbow Serpent had gone into the ground, before darkness fell.

Kimberley Artists, Mangkaja Arts, Painting Country, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Mangkaja Residency 2010 Part 2

Mandy Martin, Mangkaja Arts Residency, Fitzroy Crossing, June 2010 This brief residency with artists at the Mangkaja Arts Centre was to consolidate and expand painting in Country with the artists who last year spoke to me about wanting to follow through ideas with me which had grown out of the very successful exhibition at Australian Galleries, Melbourne, November- December 2009.  The full colour catalogue, DVD film and the exhibition had pleased them all and it was important to follow up both from my point of view and from that of the artists. We were all really happy to be able to work together. They all without exception chose the trips into Country as a way of passing on knowledge about Country to their family and me.

I focussed on 3 outstanding artists, Daisy Andrews, John Prince Siddon and Mervyn Street who have all made a quantum leap in their painting since I last worked with them. Along the way I worked with quite a few other artists including Jack Macale, Daisy Andrews son, and 13 artists from Muludja community.

Site 1: Brooklyn Springs, Knununberri

We had two trips to this well known site which Daisy identified as Big Waluk, meaning trees and rock, on the Leopold Road near Daisy Andrew’s husband’s country, Jandamarra. Daisy used to camp here with her husband and everyone met here for ceremonies.

Daisy’s nephew, John Prince Siddon came with us the first trip

Daisy's close kin, Jack Macale a Jandamarra man, came the second time. He is an art award winning artist and cultural guide for his home community, Biridu and he said they bring visitors here first for the smoking ceremony.

The school bus, driven by another of Daisy’s close kin, stopped on the way home from Fitzroy Crossing to Biridu and collected Jack Macale, (back left) and Daisy asked me to photograph her with her family.

The kids all were intrigued with my painting kit!

My final day at Mangkaja I found time to work with John Nargoodah and family on the back verandah at Mangkaja this year because of John’s other work commitments. His daughter, showed great talent in her first even canvas!

Kimberley Artists, Mangkaja Arts, Painting Country, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Mangkaja Residency 2010 Part 2

Mandy Martin, Mangkaja Arts Residency, Fitzroy Crossing, June 2010 This brief residency with artists at the Mangkaja Arts Centre was to consolidate and expand painting in Country with the artists who last year spoke to me about wanting to follow through ideas with me which had grown out of the very successful exhibition at Australian Galleries, Melbourne, November- December 2009.  The full colour catalogue, DVD film and the exhibition had pleased them all and it was important to follow up both from my point of view and from that of the artists. We were all really happy to be able to work together. They all without exception chose the trips into Country as a way of passing on knowledge about Country to their family and me.

I focussed on 3 outstanding artists, Daisy Andrews, John Prince Siddon and Mervyn Street who have all made a quantum leap in their painting since I last worked with them. Along the way I worked with quite a few other artists including Jack Macale, Daisy Andrews son, and 13 artists from Muludja community.

Site 1: Brooklyn Springs, Knununberri

We had two trips to this well known site which Daisy identified as Big Waluk, meaning trees and rock, on the Leopold Road near Daisy Andrew’s husband’s country, Jandamarra. Daisy used to camp here with her husband and everyone met here for ceremonies.

Daisy’s nephew, John Prince Siddon came with us the first trip

Daisy's close kin, Jack Macale a Jandamarra man, came the second time. He is an art award winning artist and cultural guide for his home community, Biridu and he said they bring visitors here first for the smoking ceremony.

The school bus, driven by another of Daisy’s close kin, stopped on the way home from Fitzroy Crossing to Biridu and collected Jack Macale, (back left) and Daisy asked me to photograph her with her family.

The kids all were intrigued with my painting kit!

My final day at Mangkaja I found time to work with John Nargoodah and family on the back verandah at Mangkaja this year because of John’s other work commitments. His daughter, showed great talent in her first even canvas!

Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Part 3; Bogged at Boolcoomatta

The third stage of our trip in April was to Bush Heritage Australia’s Boolcoomatta Reserve which lies about 100 kms west of Broken Hill in South Australia. www.bushheritage.org.au It is a jewel of a property in great condition and wonderful for watching birds, emus and euros. There was a large gathering of BHA staff, board members, volunteers and supporters for the weekend. As usual I slipped straight off outside or to the nearest hill to sketch when ever I could and spent two days out an historic copper mine site, painting another 6 panel work. Faye ducked off to the dump per usual and collected some old steel radial wire and fabricated 2 beautiful semi spherical vessel shapes over the visit.

Rain showers were moving across the vast chenopod landscape and once again I had to move canvases and sketches under cover and into the 4WD every time if got too damp. It was disconcerting to see the landscape so verdant and when I painted up at the mine, even the mullock heaps were tinged green from the copper and the red ochre soils were littered with many green mineral fragments lying around. This required quite a modification in my usual palette.

I largely completed a 6 panel work on paper, later finished in the studio.

I distinguished myself by getting well and truly bogged on the way to the mine site and had to use the personal satellite beacon, EPNRB, all visitors are required to use when not at the base and within an hour, two staff had arrived and pulled me out. I was mortified of course especially as all the rest of the group were waiting in vehicles to visit a site.

Anzac morning was freezing and clear and the more intrepid of the group climbed to the top of a hill where the last post was sounded apparently somewhat in advance but otherwise formalities were observed.

We drove back to NSW the day after Anzac day through tough mulga country around Cobar, stripped bare by a goat invasion, then struck locust swarms again as we headed further south. Our part of the world in central NSW looks much drier and the ground cover worse by far than most of the “desert” country we travelled though in South Australia, with the exception of Cobar. However the streets are being paved in gold there, well massive pavers of shiny polished granite in pink and black anyway, the minerals boom is rampant right through the outback it seems no matter where we travel.

Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

Part 3; Bogged at Boolcoomatta

The third stage of our trip in April was to Bush Heritage Australia’s Boolcoomatta Reserve which lies about 100 kms west of Broken Hill in South Australia. www.bushheritage.org.au It is a jewel of a property in great condition and wonderful for watching birds, emus and euros. There was a large gathering of BHA staff, board members, volunteers and supporters for the weekend. As usual I slipped straight off outside or to the nearest hill to sketch when ever I could and spent two days out an historic copper mine site, painting another 6 panel work. Faye ducked off to the dump per usual and collected some old steel radial wire and fabricated 2 beautiful semi spherical vessel shapes over the visit.

Rain showers were moving across the vast chenopod landscape and once again I had to move canvases and sketches under cover and into the 4WD every time if got too damp. It was disconcerting to see the landscape so verdant and when I painted up at the mine, even the mullock heaps were tinged green from the copper and the red ochre soils were littered with many green mineral fragments lying around. This required quite a modification in my usual palette.

I largely completed a 6 panel work on paper, later finished in the studio.

I distinguished myself by getting well and truly bogged on the way to the mine site and had to use the personal satellite beacon, EPNRB, all visitors are required to use when not at the base and within an hour, two staff had arrived and pulled me out. I was mortified of course especially as all the rest of the group were waiting in vehicles to visit a site.

Anzac morning was freezing and clear and the more intrepid of the group climbed to the top of a hill where the last post was sounded apparently somewhat in advance but otherwise formalities were observed.

We drove back to NSW the day after Anzac day through tough mulga country around Cobar, stripped bare by a goat invasion, then struck locust swarms again as we headed further south. Our part of the world in central NSW looks much drier and the ground cover worse by far than most of the “desert” country we travelled though in South Australia, with the exception of Cobar. However the streets are being paved in gold there, well massive pavers of shiny polished granite in pink and black anyway, the minerals boom is rampant right through the outback it seems no matter where we travel.

General, Art + Environment

Literature in the Arid Zone

Tom Lynch has posted his chapter on Literature in the Arid Zone  (from the Cranston and Zeller book that is hard to get) online - it may be of interest to you. http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1081&context=englishfacpubs

STRATA: DESERTS PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE.

Strata: Deserts Past Present and Future. An Environmental Art Project About a Significant Place.

Martin, M., Robin, L., Smith, M.,Strata: Deserts Past Present and Future July 2005 Goanna Press, Canberra

This book is about diverse kinds of knowledge and ways of knowing place. Indigenous knowledge depends on country- country is the context for knowledge and the place where knowledge is significant. Western science, by contrast, typically differentiates between the knowing and the place- in many cases, it seeks knowledge systems, Indigenous, scientific and artistic - and by locating them in a common place we seek co- understanding, for valuing the different ways each of us sees a single place that is significant, but differently so, for each perspective.

There was an exhibition of art works from all the artists associated with Strata, curated by Tim Rollason, Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, 18-24 July 2005.

Visit Fenner School of Environment and Society to read and download the publication.

General, Art + Environment

Literature in the Arid Zone

Tom Lynch has posted his chapter on Literature in the Arid Zone  (from the Cranston and Zeller book that is hard to get) online - it may be of interest to you. http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1081&context=englishfacpubs

STRATA: DESERTS PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE.

Strata: Deserts Past Present and Future. An Environmental Art Project About a Significant Place.

Martin, M., Robin, L., Smith, M.,Strata: Deserts Past Present and Future July 2005 Goanna Press, Canberra

This book is about diverse kinds of knowledge and ways of knowing place. Indigenous knowledge depends on country- country is the context for knowledge and the place where knowledge is significant. Western science, by contrast, typically differentiates between the knowing and the place- in many cases, it seeks knowledge systems, Indigenous, scientific and artistic - and by locating them in a common place we seek co- understanding, for valuing the different ways each of us sees a single place that is significant, but differently so, for each perspective.

There was an exhibition of art works from all the artists associated with Strata, curated by Tim Rollason, Araluen Arts Centre, Alice Springs, 18-24 July 2005.

Visit Fenner School of Environment and Society to read and download the publication.