General

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Strange Objects for Strange Times - Blog post by Libby Robin

 

The rapidly growing Climarte is an ‘Art for a Safe Climate’ movement that works to harness ‘the creative power of the Arts to inform, engage and inspire action’ through Arts events, forums and ‘creating an alliance of Arts practitioners and organisations that advocate for immediate, effective and creative action on climate change’. In May 2015, one of its events was an Anthropocene Cabinet of Curiosities, held in Australian Galleries, a major private gallery in Collingwood, Melbourne, as part of the Art Show, The Warming.(2) The curator and artist, Mandy Martin, who was a presenter at the Anthropocene Slam in Wisconsin, called on her fellow artists to make ‘Art for a Safe Climate’ and included An Anthropocene Cabinet of Curiosities with a performance-based ‘Slam’ (#anthropSLAM) as part of the opening event on 3 May 2015.

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE READING LIBBY ROBIN'S POST..

Desert Lake, General

Paruku Project. Art and Science in Aboriginal Australia Blog 15 November 2014

Paruku Project. Art and Science in Aboriginal Australia Blog 15, November 2014

DSC_5421lowresOne of the five major outcomes the Mulan community and Warruyanta Art Centre asked for from the Paruku Project was that their story should be taken to the world and this year we have achieved this through the Centre for Art + Environment exhibition which opened at the Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, Nevada 21 June and runs through till 7 December 2014.

This exhibition is drawn from the Paruku Archive and Project collection given to the Nevada Museum of Art by Basil Mcilhagga, David Leece and Mandy Martin. David Taylor also donated one of his photographs. This exhibit was necessarily smaller than the Araluen Art Centre exhibit of Desert Lake in Alice Springs in February 2013 but no less impressive given its world context in a major museum.

Four of the Paruku project team, Jamie Brown, John Carty, Guy Fitzhardinge and I were invited to attend at speak at the 2014 Art + Environment Conference in October. Jamie was unable to attend but David Leece and Fran Murrell joined us as conference participants

We participated in a sequence of panels dealing with“Fieldworks” and I was asked to talk about “Painting for Protection” given that much of the conference had been devoted to art created around humans interacting with animal species. I spoke for 10 minutes and showed a short 2 minute excerpt of the Desert Lake film, as a way of introducing the project, my artwork and the other panellists . Guy Fitzhardinge talked about our Western tendencies to separate people and environments and how it is important to understand the deep connections the Wiradjuri people have to their landscape. John Carty addressed Glenn Albrecht’s concept of “Solastalgia” which is the psychological condition people who are constantly dealing with environmental change and trauma can develop and discussed how art responds to and can mitigate that condition. Our session generated many questions both during the panel and during the rest of the conference. The art+ environment 2014 conference program is available on www.nevadaart.org and

This will be the final Paruku Project blog, (I think!). I believe that have delivered our 5 stated outcomes, (see Paruku Project Blog 1), some more effectively than others, due to the ongoing flux in desert communities and Mulan in no greater part than any other. Those outcomes were

  • Taking the Walmajarri story about Paruku to Australia and the world, through the CSIRO book, the blog, the DVD, the exhibitions in Alice Springs and Nevada Museum of Art and creating an archive in safe keeping at the Center for Art+ Environment Nevada Museum of Art.
  • Raising the Mulan communities’ sense of self-esteem and providing some training opportunities and income through sales of artworks, royalties from the book and artists and cultural fees, thereby helping the art centre get on its feet.
  • Achieving demonstrable environmental outcomes through the feral horse programme and by highlighting the importance and value of Scientists working with Indigenous Owners in their Traditional Country to further desert knowledge.
  • Achieving greater national and international understanding of how global drivers are modifying Indigenous Traditional Owners’ connection to Country in the Tanami Desert.
  • Creating a model which can be used by other communities facing similar environmental challenges which might be addressed through environmental art projects.

IMG_2993We leave the project now for posterity not only as a major book, Desert Lake. Art, Science and Stories from Paruku but as the DVD of the same name and the Project Blog, www.mandy-martin.com. The full collection of Walmajarri paintings and print folio as well as works donated by David Taylor, David Leece and Mandy Martin, are now in the permanent collection of the Nevada Museum of Art and finally the archive of the Paruku Project is now held by the Center for Art + Environment, Nevada Museum of Art.

Many of you have become good friends and frequent correspondents and I thank you all for your ongoing involvement and interest and invaluable assistance.

Plans are afoot to take the model we developed at Paruku to Arnhemland and I hope to talk with those of you who are interested about this evolving scope and potential environmental art project in 2015.

With heartfelt thanks and good wishes, Mandy

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Mandy Martin's Next Exhibition - Playing with fire

NOW OPEN at Australian Galleries (Roylston Street)MARTIN_EVITE_RS14_proof2 BUMM 2014 Conversations about the Night Parrot at Whistling Duck Creek. Installation shot Alexander Boynes 2014RNING DOWN THE HOUSE Human beings, even those who aren’t pyromaniacs, like to burn stuff. Straw effigies, old buildings, harvested fields, scraps of paper.We even put burning weeds in our mouths in order to strike up a flame, host a glowing ember within inches of our faces, and inhale the smoke.These behaviors are not entirely irrational. Burning a piece of meat allows us to extract more caloric value from it and may have helped increase the size of the human brain over evolutionary timescales.And burning land has been used by us as a hunting and farming tool for a very long time, indeed. One of the places that has helped us understand the role of burning in ecology—human social ecology as well as land management—is Australia. Which is one reason why Mandy Martin has been playing with fire for years....Click here to continue reading more from William L. Fox (Director, Center for Art + Environment Nevada Museum of Art 2014)   MARTIN_PR_RS14_proof2 SNEAK PEAK

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The Anthropocene Slam: A Cabinet of Curiosities

  Trisha Carrol & Mandy Martin.  Ochres and binder on paper, 30 x 80cms

Mandy's next international event in Madison USA, presenting at:

The Anthropocene Slam: A Cabinet of Curiosities

November 8-10 2014

The Goanna, Varanus Varius, is the totem of Wiradjuri artist, Trisha Carroll and this work that we painted together tells the story of our valley and the waves of Anthropogenic extinction that have occurred from her ancestors who practised fire burning and continued as second settlers brought cattle and mining 200 years ago. It will continue, if we do not modify our rapacious demands on landscapes until the river dries up, the earth is fully depleted and the local ecosystems destroyed. Current plans are to flood this valley to drought proof the region and provide water for irrigation and the mining industry. It will give me water views from my studio and submerge Trisha’s house. How our government can contemplate building the first dam to be approved in four decades, in this rapidly escalating period of climate change is, mind boggling.

For more information click here

 

 

Jason deCaires Taylor's underwater sculpture "Anthropocene." Photograph by Jason deCaires Taylor.

The Anthropocene: The Promise and Pitfalls of an Epochal Idea

What would it mean to imagine Homo sapiens as not merely a historical but a geological actor, a force of such magnitude that our impacts are being written into the fossil record? What would it mean to acknowledge that, for the first time in Earth’s history, a sentient species, our own, has shaken Earth’s life systems with a profundity that paleontologistAnthony Barnosky has likened to an asteroid strike? How might that perceptual shift disturb widespread assumptions about human history, ethics, power, and responsibility? Click here to read on

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The Rachel Carson Center at the Second World Congress of Environmental History

The RCC was out in force at the World Congress of Environmental History in Guimarães earlier this month, with RCC fellows, alumni, and staff represented in numerous sessions and events, many presenting in panels that were the result of collaborations started at the RCC. Perhaps the most notable RCC presence at this conference was the RCC Perspectives volume “The Edges of Environmental History,” published in February 2014 in English and in June 2014 in a Portuguese translation made by former RCC intern Filipa Soares. This volume celebrates the work of Jane Carruthers, the outgoing president of the International Consortium of Environmental History Organizations, whose work has given the discipline a decisive voice both in South African and global contexts. The artwork for the volume was provided by the acclaimed Australian landscape painter and art activist Mandy Martin, who also delivered the keynote address in Guimarães.

For more information and to continue reading please click here

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The publication is available free online here in both Portuguese and English, and in print from the Rachel Carson Center.

Desert Lake, General

Mandy speaks at The Nevada Museum of Art, Art & Environment Conference 2014

Art & Environment Conference

Mandy, along with other members of the the Paruku team will be speaking at The Nevada Museum of Art, Art & Environment Conference, Reno - Nevada Museum of Art - October 9th -11th 2014 More about the Art & Environment Conference can be found here

Coinciding with the conference The Paruku Project Exhibition continues at the Nevada Museum of Arts

THE PARUKU PROJECT, ART & SCIENCE IN ABORIGINAL AUSTRALIA

June 21st 2014 - December 7th 2014, Navada Museum of Art

The Paruku Project was a two-year effort consisting of teams of scientists, artists, and writers working in this Aboriginal desert community, one of the poorest and most remote in Australia. The first task of the teams was to assess current conditions. They found an environment severely stressed by invasive species and a culture slowly losing its identity. The second task was to design and implement cross-cultural and transformational responses to these conditions, many of which involved artmaking.

Australian artist Mandy Martin and conservationist Guy Fitzhardinge, along with writer and artist Kim Mahood, worked with Walmajari people to revitalize the art center in Mulan, which in turn helped attract attention and funding from policy makers to address challenges facing the region  Click here to continue reading & for exhibition details

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Desert Lake, General

Mandy speaks at The Nevada Museum of Art, Art & Environment Conference 2014

Art & Environment Conference

Mandy, along with other members of the the Paruku team will be speaking at The Nevada Museum of Art, Art & Environment Conference, Reno - Nevada Museum of Art - October 9th -11th 2014 More about the Art & Environment Conference can be found here

Coinciding with the conference The Paruku Project Exhibition continues at the Nevada Museum of Arts

THE PARUKU PROJECT, ART & SCIENCE IN ABORIGINAL AUSTRALIA

June 21st 2014 - December 7th 2014, Navada Museum of Art

The Paruku Project was a two-year effort consisting of teams of scientists, artists, and writers working in this Aboriginal desert community, one of the poorest and most remote in Australia. The first task of the teams was to assess current conditions. They found an environment severely stressed by invasive species and a culture slowly losing its identity. The second task was to design and implement cross-cultural and transformational responses to these conditions, many of which involved artmaking.

Australian artist Mandy Martin and conservationist Guy Fitzhardinge, along with writer and artist Kim Mahood, worked with Walmajari people to revitalize the art center in Mulan, which in turn helped attract attention and funding from policy makers to address challenges facing the region  Click here to continue reading & for exhibition details

DSC09241

 

General

The Edges of Environmental History Honouring Jane Carruthers

The Edges of Environmental History

The Edges of Environmental HistoryThe Edges of Environmental History Honouring Jane Carruthers This volume of RCC Perspectives, featuring artwork by Australian artist Mandy Martin, is a tribute to the wonderful career of Jane Carruthers. It is also an exploration of South Africa’s contributions to world environmental history and the sister disciplines along its edges. A pioneer of environmental history in South Africa, Jane Carruthers is also a leader in global and transnational environmental history and a distinguished biographer. This volume explores some of the partnerships between environmental history and other intellectual endeavours, particularly those where Jane Carruthers’ work has been inspirational: animal studies, natural resource management, the history of biology, and the broader environmental humanities.

View the full pdf, including Mandy Martin's cover image, and the four images for the book parts here 

The final book, which will be in English and Portuguese and which includes the portfolio of art that is in the second interlude will be launched at the World Congress of Environmental History: Guimaraes, Portugal, July 2014.
This book will include foldout pages which couldn't fit the pdf format of the paintings Mandy Martin created for Inflows: the Channel Country Mandy Martin, Jane Carruthers, Guy Fitzhardinge, Tom Griffiths, Peter Haynes 2001.

Mandy Martin will give a plenary keynote presentation at the conference on Friday July 11 from 18.00-19.30 pm.

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Melbourne Review Article

Melbourne Review Image  

Art Climate Ethics

By Jane Llewellyn

With so much discussion and debate in our society on the environment particularly climate change, its' not surprising that it's a popular subject for many Australian artists.  The role of arts and artists in this debate is the topic being discussed at the forum, Art Climate Ethics part of the program for the Sustainable Living Festival.

To read on please click here (See page 2)

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Encountering-the-anthropocene-conference-2014

ENCOUNTERING THE ANTHROPOCENE

Anthropocene_FlyerTHE ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

CONFERENCE 26–28 FEBRUARY 2014

Human beings now control the very life processes of the Earth; we have moved from being serial depleters of local environments to becoming a geophysical force that shapes the planet. While geologists make their case to formalize and adopt this epoch, the role of environmental humanities and social sciences has become crucially lin

ked with our allies in the natural and technological sciences in seeking to understand and meet the challenges and changes thrown up by the new epoch.

Our role is to help interpret the impacts, understand the implications, and engage the public in developing alternative ways forward. How to do all this will be explored and debated in the conference and its related events and workshops.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CLICK HERE

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Australia Day 2014 Celebratory Exhibition Curated by artist Leo Robba (Derby Street)

AUSTDAY_EVITE _DS14Australian Galleries (Derby Street) In association with The Age, invites you to the opening 'AUSTRALIA DAY 2014 'Celebratory Exhibition' Curated by artist Leo Robba.

Saturday 25 January 2014 6pm to 8pm

35 DerbyStreet. Collingwood .VIC3066

To be opened at 7pm by Margaret Easterbrook Editor The Saturday Age

Current until Sunday 2 February 2014

Open 7 days 10am to 6pm T 03 9417 4303 derbyst@australiangalleries.com.au australiangalleries.com.au

Click on image above for more information

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Australia Day 2014 Celebratory Exhibition Curated by artist Leo Robba (Roylston Street)

AUSTDAY_EVITE_RS13Australian Galleries (Roylston Street) In association with The Syndey Morning Herald, Invites you to the opening 'AUSTRALIA DAY 2014  Celebratory Exhibition' Curated by artist Leo Robba.

Friday 24 January 2014 6pm to 8pm 15 Roylston Street Paddington NSW 2021

To be opened at 7pm by Darren Goodsir Editor-in-Chief The Sydney Morning Herald

Current until Sunday 16 February 2014

Open 7 days 10am to 6pm T 02 9360 5177 roylstonst@australiangalleries.com.au australiangalleries.com.au

Click on image above for more information

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Art Climate Ethics: What role for the arts?

View the Art Climate Ethics Forum online now http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JTwrxjd5TaI

CLIMARTE_forum_final.lr

Mandy Martin speaks at Climarte's discussion: ART CLIMATE ETHICS: WHAT ROLE FOR THE ARTS?

6.00 - 7.30PM (ENTRY FROM 5.30PM)

Saturday 15 February, 2014

Deakin Edge, Federation Square, Melbourne

Please click on the image above for more information.

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Mandy Martin talks at Art + Environment Conference 2011, Nevada Museum of Art, October 1, 2011

The Conservation Impulse: Navigating the Waters of Art and Science in Australia

This session brings together a range of creative voices working toward the conservation of landscapes, communities, and environments in Australia. John Carty, Mandy Martin, and Libby Robin will discuss their Desert Channels project, focusing on the region of southwestern-Queensland. Architect Richard Black proposes a series of sustainable design solutions to improve the health of the Murray River system, and artist John Reid presents Fishman, a unique project that is part performance art, natural history theater, and conservation campaign in New South Wales. Dr. Stephen G. Wells, President of the Desert Research Institute moderates the discussion.

 

Uncategorized, General

Braided Channels Symposium Features Australian Artist, Rancher

From: http://www.prairiefirenewspaper.com/2011/09/braided-channels-symposium-features-australian-artist-rancher

Immigration in Nebraska

By Tom Lynch

Imagine this place:

—A river network flows in intricate braids through the rolling terrain of a semiarid grassland.

—An amazing diversity of interesting and unique animals and plants resides here.

—Pioneering families from Europe who settled this region have become part of the national mythology.

—Yet the European-style agricultural practices these settlers introduced have greatly diminished the abundance and diversity of the place’s natural ecosystem.

—Simultaneously, for the past few decades, human populations have declined, and this place suffers a crisis in maintaining the viability of many small towns and rural communities

—In response, community efforts are now being made to transform those agricultural practices so that they could be both socially and ecologically sustainable.

—Meanwhile, extreme variations in river flows, exacerbated by climate change, complicate agriculture, and political battles rage over the control of this water.

—At the same time, efforts are being made to protect and properly utilize a vast underground aquifer.

—Finally, though rarely on the minds of most of the citizens of its larger nation, this place nevertheless sparks the imagination of many different artists, writers and photographers.

Where is this place? Well, you might guess that this description fits the Platte River watershed and the Great Plains bioregions of Nebraska. But you’d be only half right. For this description also applies to the Channel Country of Australia’s Outback.

Though literally a world apart, these regions have much in common. Australia’s Channel Country faces many of the same environmental and sustainable development concerns as do the rural portions of the Great Plains. These include how to preserve biodiversity while maintaining ranching and other agricultural activities in a semiarid grassland, as well as how to diversify economic activities in rural areas in order to maintain viable communities.

And both the Channel Country and the Great Plains are traversed by braided river networks that provide an imaginative model for how different human communities, distinct disciplines and diverse ways of knowing can combine to further these conservation efforts and to nurture a common human and natural landscape.

In this spirit, the Plains Humanities Alliance is presenting “Braided Channels,” an interdisciplinary and international symposium, to be held in Ocober in Lincoln, Neb. The event is free and open to the public.

What is distinctive and exciting about this symposium is that it will consider the environmental and cultural problems of these two places from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. It will examine how the arts and humanities, in particular painting, literature and environmental history, can intertwine with the ecological sciences, such as grassland studies and conservation biology, to nurture rural development that is sustainable in both the human and the ecological sense.

The symposium features two Australian speakers, Mandy Martin and Guy Fitzhardinge.

“Ethabuka Spring,” one of 12 4' × 4' landscape studies of the Channel Country in Australia’s Outback. (Mandy Martin)

Martin is one of Australia’s leading contemporary artists. She has spearheaded innovative projects combining art with ecological awareness to promote environmental protection and sustainable rural economic development in Queensland and New South Wales. She has a strong commitment to regional arts and has mentored many artists and run environmental art workshops in diverse locations the past five years, including Fitzroy Crossing, Arnhem Land, South West Queensland, the Simpson Desert and closer to home in the Central West of New South Wales. Many of the projects have been reconciliation land-art projects. In July 2011 she began a new multidisciplinary environmental art project with artists, scientists and indigenous traditional owners at Paruku, in the Tanami Desert.

Fitzhardinge is a pastoralist (rancher) who manages several properties in New South Wales and Queensland. He has been involved in various projects to develop sustainable ranching techniques and to improve the ecology of the semiarid regions while simultaneously nurturing sustainable rural communities.

Since its inception, he has participated in the Australian Landcare movement, a program to develop more sustainable land management practices. Guy has also served on the board of Bush Heritage Australia, a conservation organization that grew during Guy’s tenure from a staff of nine and about seven small properties to a staff or nearly 70 and 34 properties totaling almost two million hectares. Guy is chairman of a trust set up by the PEW Environmental Trust and The Nature Conservancy to fund land-management work by a number of indigenous communities in remote Arnhem Land in far northern Australia. He is a governor of World Wildlife Fund Australia. In addition to these conservation activities, Guy has also played major roles in the red meat/beef industry in Australia. He is currently the chairman of the Beef Genetics Cooperative Research Centre, an organization set up with 17 partners, which works with the USDA, several U.S. universities and various Canadian institutions to carry out all the genetic research for the beef industry in Australia. His Ph.D. dissertation examines the role of landscape art in the development of environmental values among pastoralists in New South Wales.

In their keynote presentations, Martin and FItzhardinge will discuss their efforts to cultivate environmental awareness in Australia’s rangelands through the use of art, environmental history and a series of community book projects that have recently culminated in the publication of “Desert Channels: The Impulse to Conserve.”

Their talks will be followed by a panel discussion featuring nine university and community experts braided together from a range of disciplines. These include Dana Fritz and Jeffrey Thompson from the Art Department, Robert Brooke from English, Cheryl Burkhart-Kriesel from Agricultural Economics, Martin Massengale of the Center for Grassland Studies, Donna Woudenberg from the National Drought Mitigation Center, Mark Burbach and Larkin Powell from the School for Natural Resources and Teresa Franta from the Grassland Foundation.

The Braided Channels symposium will be held Oct. 5 from 2–5 p.m. at the Center for Great Plains Studies, Hewit Place, 1155 Q Street in Lincoln, Neb. The symposium is sponsored by the University of Nebraska’s Institute for Agriculture and Natural Resources, the University Research Council, the Plains Humanities Alliance, the Center for Great Plains Studies and the Department of English. For more information, contact Tom Lynch at tplynch2[at]gmail[dot]com.

 

Copyright 2007-2011 Prairie Fire Enterprises, LLC

Desert Channels, Desert Lake, General, Art + Environment

The Big Wet; Art , Science and History collaborate in the Desert Channels Country

The Big Wet: Art, Science and History collaborate in Desert Channels Country

 

 

To celebrate the launch of the CSIRO book, "Desert Channels. The Impulse to Conserve" Mike Smith chaired a forum at the National Museum of Australia on 22 October 2010. The panel was comprised of one of Australia's best known artists, Mandy Martin, together with historian Libby Robin, zoologist Chris Dickman and Guy Fitzhardinge, deputy chair of Desert Channels Queensland. They explored the impulse to protect the country where Australia’s desert rivers rise. At a time when Lake Eyre is filling fast, and biodiversity is booming, they discussed conservation partnerships in Desert Channels Country and displayed new art and writing about the region.